The Well House,  Charterhouse 

Here is one of my favourite views in The Charterhouse. That curling support for the guttering (top left) is characteristic: details that delight the eye.

 

I drew this standing in the roadway. The suppliers and drivers coming and going were very gracious.

Barbican towers are just visible over the autumn trees.

Here’s what it looked like before the colour:

3 Nov 2016 (1 - outline only)

St Edwards Passage Cambridge

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A quick sketch on a cold day. 45 minutes, standing outside the “Indigo Coffee House”. Nearby, bicycles were parked on the fence surrounding the church of St Edward, King and Martyr.

I wanted to catch the bright sunlight in Kings Parade, seen from the relative darkness of St Edwards Passage.

Finsbury Health Centre

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Built 1935-38 designed by Lubetkin and the Tecton Architectural Practice.

Partly restored mid 1990s, but still looks dilapidated, especially round the back.

Evidently still in use as a medical centre. While I drew the picture, ambulances arrived and departed, carrying elderly and disabled patients. A mother and child looked at my drawing. The mother encouraged the child to see how slowly I was drawing.

Posting this in 2019, after I went to the Wellcome Collection “Living Buildings” exhibition, and learned how carefully this health centre had been thought about. There was a mural inside, which was destroyed in the Second World War.

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Postcard from wellcomecollection.org, “Exhibition display panels explaining features of the design of the Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, Finsbury London. Cheerful atmosphere. Lubetkin and tectonic. 1938. RIBA collection.”

The Charterhouse, Chapel roof

This is my first sketch at The Charterhouse, as a guest of the Preacher, Reverend Robin Isherwood.

The building on the right is the Great Hall, Tudor, around 1600. Beyond it is a Barbican tower, 1970s.
The small dome is the roof of the Chapel of The Charterhouse, 17th Century, by Francis Carter. According to Pevsner*, Francis Carter had “previously worked at Trinity College Cambridge, and from 1614 was chief clerk of the King’s Works under Inigo Jones.”

*The Buildings of England, LONDON 4: NORTH, Bridget Cherry and Nicolas Pevsner, page 619