The journey to the chapel of St Antonis

Here is a collage made for friends in Switzerland.

I posted it at the Post Office in Kalami on 8th May. The official there did not seem to be concentrating very hard. He looked dubiously at the word “Switzerland” on the address. I think I need to find out what “Switzerland” is in Greek.

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The card is made from seeds and bits found on the walk.

Here is the construction in progress. Clothes pegs are an important tool.

Agias Triada, small chapel

We visited the monastery again, before going to the airport. Two large coaches were in the car park.

As I drew the chapel, fragments of dialogue in French and German floated by. A French-speaker was relieved at last to have a call from Yves. He described in detail where the car was, naming the Greek village. He must insist it be ready by Thursday.

A woman with a German American accent told me my drawing was beautiful. I told her I was glad she liked it.

By and large people were respectful and did not stand in front of me while I sketched. But, according to John, a guy with a big heavy camera photographed the drawing, over my shoulder, without my knowing.

After an hour and a half John came to alert me that we should leave in 5 minutes.

Pen and ink. 1 hour 40.

Here’s what it looked like before adding the tones:

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From Provlita, waiting for the bill

We finished our meal and looked for the waiter. He was otherwise occupied in a series of activities which didn’t involve us. I started doing a drawing. IMG_0083

15 minutes later we had paid, and the drawing was done.

It was a good meal though. In Crete, one must slow down and enjoy the view.

 

Agias Triada

17th century monastery on the Akrotiri Peninsula, western Crete. A working monastery, with 5 monks, and adjacent vineyards and olive groves. A beautiful and sacred place.

Pen and ink. The tone is diluted ink, and was tricky to put on, as it dried quickly in the heat, and can’t be lifted as watercolour can. It’s “De Atramentis document ink” which is formulated for signing legal documents. Once on, it can’t be removed. This is good for pen and wash, because the dilute watercolour does not lift the ink.

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Here’s the sketch before adding the tone:
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About 1hr30.

The White Mountains and the wall of Aptera

A very quick sketch, 5 minutes, coloured later.
From the Turkish Fort at Aptera.
Robert Pashley sketched a section of the wall in 1833, noting its ‘polygonal’ stones. All the stones looked polygonal to us. We found the section he drew, though.

The Theatre, Ancient Aptera

Ancient Greek and Roman theatre, first constructed 3rd century BC, modified by the Romans 1st century AD. In the 20th century it was used as a lime kiln, remains of which were still there when we first visited here in 2009. In the last 5 years the remnants of the lime kiln have been removed, and the theatre is much restored. EU funding acknowledged on the notices.

Drawn and coloured on location. About an hour.

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Etching: the City

An etching created and printed at East London Printmakers.
Basis of a New Year card.

Ink on Fabriano paper, just under 12 inches by 6 inches, to fit in a 6inch square envelope when folded.
The white line is sewing cotton, laid on the plate.

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img 9446 – close-up
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img 9445 – whole card, 12 inches by 6 inches

 

Stormy Seas, Raft

“Found image”, after wiping an etching plate.
I’m pleased at how the shape of this plate is articulate of a horizontal rectangle, even with no other clues. The black ink round the plate looks to me like the sea. But perhaps that’s just wishful thinking.