The North Garden, Charterhouse

 

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A sketch in the North Garden of The Charterhouse.

This wall is very old. The letters “A” and “N” in the drawing are iron, embedded in the brickwork. The whole message is spelled out along the 100 feet or so of the wall and reads “ANNO 1571”.

The door is more like a tunnel in the thick brickwork. It has a grass path leading to it and looks functional. Nobody went in or out while I was drawing it.
I loved this part of the garden. It was very quiet, and, for winter, amazingly lush. There was even birdsong.
It was, however, very cold. So I only could do one drawing. My hands and legs were becoming stiff. Behind me, another painting waited to be done: bright orange seedpods of the plant I know as “Chinese Lanterns”, and a very dignified old tree, gnarled but upright.
But I had to get back into the warm.

As I drew this, the gardener passed and re-passed, going down into a basement nearby. He said I wasn’t in their way. “You’re alright,” he said.

About 1hr45, to 11:10am. Drawn and coloured on location.

Here is the pen and ink, before the watercolour went on.

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Thank you to the Preacher of Charterhouse, Rev Robin Isherwood, and the Brothers and workers at Charterhouse for their hospitality.
It’s a marvellous pleasure to visit.

The Charterhouse EC1 – Over the boundary

Two sketches, both from Preacher’s Court, The Charterhouse. One shows the view looking South West, past the new accommodation block. The other looks North East towards the John Vane Science Centre of Queen Mary, University of London campus.

View South West, beyond the Admiral Ashmore building

The new accommodation block in Charterhouse was built in 2000, designed by Michael Hopkins and partners, architects also of Portcullis House. It is called “The Admiral Ashmore Building”.

View North-East, with the John Vane Science block in the background

The John Vane Science Centre houses, amongst other things, the London Genome Centre.

In the Charterhouse, the leaves show Autumn colours, untroubled by wind, in the enclosed courtyard. It was still very cold. I sketched there from 09:30 to 12:30.

The Admiral Ashmore building

Here is a sketch from Preacher’s Court, Charterhouse.

I did it just after “The Well House” sketch.

3 Nov 2016 (2)

I liked the three ages of buildings: the 16th and 17th Century Hall on the left, the Admiral Ashmore Building (2000) and the 1970s office blocks and flats behind, with scrappy enhancements, probably 21st Century.

I got very cold.

A brother came by and told me he was the oldest, at 88. He was going to lead Grace at lunch. Everyone would have to stand up. It was like being at school. “I have the mind of a 15-year-old boy,” he informed me, “You had better watch out!”

The Well House,  Charterhouse 

Here is one of my favourite views in The Charterhouse. That curling support for the guttering (top left) is characteristic: details that delight the eye.

 

I drew this standing in the roadway. The suppliers and drivers coming and going were very gracious.

Barbican towers are just visible over the autumn trees.

Here’s what it looked like before the colour:

3 Nov 2016 (1 - outline only)

The Charterhouse, Chapel roof

This is my first sketch at The Charterhouse, as a guest of the Preacher, Reverend Robin Isherwood.

The building on the right is the Great Hall, Tudor, around 1600. Beyond it is a Barbican tower, 1970s.
The small dome is the roof of the Chapel of The Charterhouse, 17th Century, by Francis Carter. According to Pevsner*, Francis Carter had “previously worked at Trinity College Cambridge, and from 1614 was chief clerk of the King’s Works under Inigo Jones.”

*The Buildings of England, LONDON 4: NORTH, Bridget Cherry and Nicolas Pevsner, page 619